Tale behind Mahindra’s #CutTheCrap campaign

Samosa Talks

Explaining how polythene bags are a weapon of mass destruction, Mahindra Rise launched #CutTheCrap campaign to raise awareness about environmental issues.

With the help of social listening, The Mahindra Group learned that the environment was among the top three concerns for the Millenials. More specifically, the topics of interest included inadequate waste management and the damage caused by single-use plastics. These key insights drove the Mahindra Group to launch its new #CutTheCrap campaign. 

The campaign has been launched with a film that equates the problems caused by single-use plastic bags to weapons of mass destruction. A part of the #RiseForGood communication series, #CutTheCrap aims to alert viewers about the damaging effects of plastic and other forms of non-recyclable waste and exhorts them to inculcate smart waste management practices.

In the past, Mahindra has brought attention to social issues like girl child education and deforestation as part of the series.  

The creative process

In all the campaigns taken up by Mahindra under #RiseForGood, the issues are selected after passing the options through several filters. First, they check whether people care about the cause. Social media listening comes into play here. The next filter is whether Mahindra has the credibility to talk about the issue. The cause is taken up only if the company has done some significant work in the area. The third leg of the process is where they go beyond the awareness aspect and try to enable people to participate.

“Every campaign that we do under #RiseForGood is something we have walked the talk and then we have talked the talk,” said Vivek Nayer, Chief Marketing Officer, Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd. In the case of #CutTheCrap, 1.4 lac tonnes of waste was reused, composted and recycled by the company in 2018, about 80% of the total waste that was being generated by them, before the campaign came about.

“The idea was to help the viewer see the harmless-looking plastic bag from a whole new perspective. By equating it with some of the deadliest weapons known to mankind, we drew attention to the looming threat that is already upon us,” said Robby Mathew, Chief Creative Officer, FCB Interface.

The brand recall factor

Since the campaign is not selling a product, how does one add a brand recall factor to the mix? “These campaigns are done by the corporate team of Mahindra and our objective is slightly different. It is not about selling vehicles and tractors. That is done by the business marketing teams do. #RiseForGood campaigns are about telling people what we stand for and make conversations happen,” says Vivek, adding that people will be positively disposed towards the brand and hopefully, it will reflect in sales but that’s not the direct impact that they are aiming for. It will happen indirectly, eventually.

Also Read: Main thing in a client-agency relationship is ‘partnership’: Vivek Nayer

He further explains the process using #CutTheCrap as an example: It’s a film brought to you by Mahindra and in the film, we talk about the good work that Mahindra has done, and towards the end, we direct people to the #RiseForGood website where we talk about our work and connect people to the NGOs. So, the brand connect is there through and through.

Bringing about change

“Corporates or NGOs or the government alone can’t make a difference, everyone has to join in, including common people and that we have done for every campaign,” he says, adding that a lot of people want to do good but they don’t know how to do it and who to go to. So, Mahindra shortlisted six NGOs that have the expertise in this area and those can be contacted if someone wishes to be a part of the movement.

This 360-degree campaign includes promotion across digital and social media, supported by select television and print media. The campaign will also include creatives to enable people to reduce, reuse and recycle waste, combined with celebrating change-makers, along with content-based engagements to highlight the significant waste management efforts at Mahindra Group companies.


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