10 Photojournalists you MUST follow on Instagram

photojournalists

Illustrating the world through their lenses to recite soul stirring tales, some photographers encapsulate poignant moments into visuals. Creating a striking visual museum through their Instagram, these masterpieces are overpowering words and enacting emotions thus embracing the journey of a photojournalist along.

As they say, a picture speaks a thousand words and we say a plethora of emotions; Social Samosa curates a list of some spectacular photojournalists.

Lynsey Addario

An American photojournalist, Lynsey, takes us to through the raw nooks and corners of the world with her photographs, building a visually pleasureful experience for us to witness the world through her eyes.

#WorldRefugeeDay: Roughly 65 million people are currently displaced from their homes due to war and persecution, and 24 people are displaced every minute, according to the @unrefugees. This image: Nyakar Unwa, 34, holds her severely malnourished daughter, Monday, 6 months, who is being treated for malnutrition and additional complications at a tent hospital run by Doctors Without Borders at the base of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan base in Malakal, in the Upper Nile region, South Sudan, May 11, 2014. Nyakar, who has seven children, was displaced from her village of Owach during the civil war, and her family lost everything: their crops, cattle, and home. They were forced to sell their clothes for food. One million Southern Sudanese have been displaced from their homes since the start of the civil war in December 2013, pitting ethnic Nu’er against Dinka. Photographed on assignment for @nytimes

A photo posted by Lynsey Addario (@lynseyaddario) on

Simone Bramante

A visual storyteller arrests beauty through his lenses, often landscape imagery and human subjects.

Kitra Cahana

Enhancing the beauty of every photograph, her pictures are not just visually pleasurable but exhale emotions.

Going through the archive. Lost photo. Austin, Texas. 2011.

A photo posted by @kitracahana on

Phil Hatcher-Moore

Depicting an unrealistic world through his photographs, Moore has excelled the art of surrealism.

Spot of fog on the hills this morning. #mist #woodland #publicrightofway #Wales #Llangollen #movetothecountry

A photo posted by Phil Hatcher-Moore (@philmoorephoto) on

Benjamin Lowy

The photographer who covered the 2003 Iraq War and been embedded in Libya, Afghanistan, and Darfur is bringing the world and beyond all under one roof of his Instagram profile.

Marcus Bleasdale

Photographer at the National Geographic through his Instagram is visually representing his musing on historic architecture and glorious environment.

Morning chilly world. Minus 15 out there today

A photo posted by marcus bleasdale (@marcusbleasdale) on

Morning #selwyncollege #cambridge

A photo posted by marcus bleasdale (@marcusbleasdale) on

Ed Kashi

Documenting the on-going mayhem at Syria, Kashi a photojournalist, filmmaker and lecturer through his Instagram is portraying the world of Syrian refugees, oozing of emotions and getting us up, close, and personal with their misery amongst the others.

Refugees walk through the overcrowded Al Za’atri refugee camp for Syrians, near Mafraq, Jordan on Nov. 17, 2013. I am participating in the inaugural exhibit of #ARTTN Gallery: ‘Free to Be,’ which features this image among many others. Participating photographers are showcasing work that explores the beauty, dignity, and #humanity of women and children around the world who have lost some aspect (or all aspects) of their freedom. ARTTN Gallery is a premier online art gallery that actively pursues social impact through visual storytelling. At least 10% of all sales will fund a project by @NFS that serves women and children exiting a life as victims of human #trafficking in #Romania. Check out the full gallery and purchase prints to help make a difference. Visit: www.arttngallery.com

A photo posted by Ed Kashi (@edkashi) on

Ibadulla, 47 and Haver, 49, peer out the window of their small home in the village of Taxta Korpu which is home to 13,000 refugees in Aghjabadi, Azerbaijan on May 27, 2013. I am participating in the inaugural exhibit of #ARTTN Gallery: ‘Free to Be,’ which features this image among many others. Participating photographers are showcasing work that explores the beauty, dignity, and #humanity of women and children around the world who have lost some aspect (or all aspects) of their freedom. ARTTN Gallery is a premier online art gallery that actively pursues social impact through visual storytelling. At least 10% of all sales will fund a project by @NFS that serves women and children exiting a life as victims of human #trafficking in #Romania. Check out the full gallery and purchase prints to help make a difference. Visit: www.arttngallery.com

A photo posted by Ed Kashi (@edkashi) on

Andrew Quilty

As his bio reads ‘Stories not selfies’, this storyteller has embarked upon a journey to take us along with the naked world, putting out the beauties and flawless imperfections through this photographs.

The Maghrib prayer, prayed beneath the watchful eye of an aerostat surveillance blimp on a hill home to the tomb of King Mohammed Nadir Khan. Khan ruled Afghanistan from 1929 until his assassination in 1933, which saw him join the long list of national leaders whose tenures—before and after—came to similar ends. Although the past twenty years in Afghanistan are known as some of the most tumultuous for the country, assassinations of heads of state have occurred (not for lack of trying) less than at any other time in the past century. The Taliban’s Mullah Mohammad Omar, the so-called leader of the faithful, died of natural causes in a hospital in Pakistan in 2013, while Hamid Karzai and current President Ashraf Ghani are still standing. The one exception is Burhanuddin Rabbani, president during the Afghan civil war years of the mid-90s, who was killed by a suicide bomber in 2011, at home on his 71st birthday. He was head of Afghanistan’s High Peace Council at the time. One of two bombers had hidden explosives in his turban and before detonating reportedly told Rabbani that he had a message from the Taliban. Photo: @andrewquilty. 4.11.2016. #Kabul #Afghanistan #maghrib #prayer

A photo posted by Andrew Quilty (@andrewquilty) on

Randy Olson

Overwhelmed with emotions, hues and drama, Olson has his own perspective towards the world and he’s putting it across through spectacular visuals.

photo by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — You were braver than the rest. You watched, I put out my hand. It was a dare, a game I played everywhere with kids who’d scrum around us, faces full of questions. Some turned and ran when I moved. Others shrieked and laughed, keeping distance, wary as birds. You stepped forward. Fearless, dressed in beads and dust. Randy caught the moment in the village of Duss, home of the Kara tribe, who became our good friends over many weeks working along the Omo River. I love this image, and partly because I remember so little about it. Usually I’d regret that. Photographs for me are windows, and I like to find and know what’s beyond the frame. But here, forgetting is all right. Her joy accounts for whatever’s missing. It nearly obliterates the need to know more. I remember once watching my niece greet a dog for the first time. She was only slightly younger and did not yet understand the dog or see exactly how or whether it was different. She reached out. Laid a hand on the patient shoulder. Then she smiled up at her father, just like this. This image is an out-take from our recent Instagram series on Ethiopia’s Omo River and Kenya’s Lake Turkana, where we’ve worked over the last six years documenting culture, change, and conflict. You can see the whole project archived at #NGwatershedstories, and find our features about this region in @natgeo magazine. For more of our documentary work, please check in @randyolson and @neilshea13. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #kenya #omoriver #laketurkana #river #lake #kara #notebook #portrait #makeportraits #culture #documentary #everydayafrica @thephotosociety

A photo posted by Randy Olson (@randyolson) on

photo by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — Smeared with grass and gut juice the shy grinning children held in their arms piles of rank cud. In their hair flecks of the bull’s last meal stiffened and dried, while on their bare chests, faces, and lips it clung like wet confetti. The bull had been killed with a stone. Its brains bashed in, its lungs spear-pierced. Brutal and not quick but done in love, for there is no earthly creature held in such regard as a beautiful long-horned bull. Though it was terrible to watch (though I still hear the blows, those dull thuds, and see the bull crash down), I found no malice in the killing. Only heavy-handed tradition. The beast’s flesh had been roasted and shared, feeding dozens of Daasanach men from many generations. Even the skull was charred black and picked over until nothing went wasted. Then, late in the day, one last honor for the hosts, the family who had shared so much feasting with friends. The stomach, saved aside, was opened and the pale cud scooped out. This was carried in potent armfuls to the waiting troop and daubed with affection all over their slender bodies. Children were given most of it and clutched thick wads, happy in memory of a creature they’d cared for, feeling its warmth fade against their ribs. We do this for luck, an old man told me. We believe it brings good things for the children. The boys and girls would wear the blessing to bed and in the morning, adults said, they’d bathe. But I remembered how boys, like puppies, love scent and hate washing, and next day I saw them running toward chores, still wearing luck in their hair, still bringing that bull out to pasture. These Instagram pieces are part of our ongoing project, #NGwatershedstories, and they’re linked to our feature article on Kenya’s Lake Turkana in the August issue of @natgeo magazine. Join us @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we follow water down the desert. #2014 #africa #kenya #laketurkana #jadesea #daasanach #celebration #tradition #bull #portrait #documentary #everydayafrica #everydayeverywhere @thephotosociety @geneticislands

A photo posted by Randy Olson (@randyolson) on

Steve McCurry

As his bio suggests, Steve’s body of work spans conflicts, vanishing cultures, ancient traditions and contemporary culture alike – yet always retains the human element. He’s also the photographer who shot to fame after his illustrious ‘Afghan Girl.’

With utmost delight, I announce that Sharbat Gula is now free from the legal troubles she endured over the past couple of weeks. She soon will also be free from an uncertain life of a refugee as she will be on her way back to her own country as soon as next Monday where she still is a beloved image and a national icon. She will be met by President Ashraf Ghani upon her arrival to welcome her back home and help her with her resettlement. I take this opportunity to thank all those who voiced their support and sympathy to the case of Sharbat Gula. This includes prominent as well as ordinary people within the Government, civil society, Peshawar Court and FIA office, media and the public in large. You all played a significant role resulting in today’s good news. – Dr Omar Zakhilwal, Afghanistan Ambassador to Pakistan. Upon arrival, Sharbat will meet President Ghani in Kabul, and will be given the keys to her new house. THANK YOU everyone for your support, your contributions and your concern.

A photo posted by Steve McCurry (@stevemccurryofficial) on

Kevin Frayer

Amalgamating the splendor of different worlds through his photographs, Frayer’s aesthetically alluring Instagram is a catlogue of this beautiful innate world.

Cooks on break #china

A photo posted by @kevinfrayer on

If you know of more such talented photojournalists, do let us know of them on [email protected]


You may also like:

Comments